Opioid Epidemic: It’s Not A Myth

Earlier this month, Rich Baudry had the privilege of speaking to a group of local medical professionals about the ongoing opioid epidemic in the United States. The panel discussion, which was held at University Medical Center, featured lively group discussion from doctors, nurses, nursing students, and educators about opioid use, addiction and alternative forms of treatment for pain.

“It was inspiring to speak with the bright medical professionals of our future and raise awareness of alternate forms of pain treatment such as physical therapy,” said Baudry. “I think it is important to know that even though pain is personal, treating pain takes teamwork.”

Physical therapists treat pain through movement, hands-on care, and patient education.

“We play a valuable role in setting realistic expectations for recovery with or without opioids. We don’t just treat pain symptoms, we find out what is causing the pain and help alleviate it at the source. PT helps patients deal with pain both physically and mentally; whereas opioids just mask the pain.” said Baudry.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sales of prescription opioids have quadrupled in the United States, even though “there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.”

The CDC recently recommended nonopioid approaches like PT when*:

  • The risks of opioid use outweigh the rewards. Potential side effects of opioids include depression, overdose, and addiction, plus withdrawal symptoms when stopping opioid use. Because of these risks, opioids should not be first treatment for chronic pain.
  • Patients want to do more than mask the pain. 79% of patients would prefer non-pharmalogical treatment options. Opioids can mask the pain, but it does not treat the problem. PTs treat pain through movement while partnering with patients to improve or maintain their mobility and quality of life.
  • Pain is located in low backhip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. Evidence shows that exercise as part of a physical therapy treatment plan is most favorable for these conditions.
  • Opioids are prescribed for pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients should receive “the lowest effective dosage,” and opioids “should be combined” with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.
  • Pain lasts 90 days. After 90 days, pain is considered “chronic,” and the risks for continued opioid use increase. An estimated 116 million Americans have chronic pain each year. The CDC guidelines note that nonopioid therapies are “preferred” for chronic pain and that “clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient.”

If you or someone you love is suffering with chronic pain, call Baudry Therapy Center and we can help you start living life again.

*Source: MoveForward PT

Dry needling alleviates pain for tennis professional

Tennis professional returns to court after dry needling

Joey Kuchler is a tennis professional/coach and an avid tennis player. One day while playing, he landed on a tennis ball and turned his ankle. His pain led him to Baudry Therapy Center for pain relief and return to work/sport with dry needling. Here’s how Joey returned to the court:

“At first, I was a bit nervous about the dry needling, because needles! But the process brought immediate relief to muscles that had been glued stuck. Now they are relaxed. My ankle’s range of motion was limited, causing pain in my work as a tennis teaching pro.

The Baudry team performed ASTYM, dry needling, and manual manipulation of my ankle. Then, they educated me about how the injury was hindering certain muscles and joints. They measured some of my weaknesses resulting from injury, and showed me targeted stretches and exercises to develop better mobility and strength.
I was pleasantly surprised at how much I learned about how muscles and joints should work together. Mine weren’t performing properly due to my injury, but I am confident now to be able to return to tennis safe and pain-free.

I am still doing the work they prescribed as a part of my daily routine to stay healthy. I highly recommend Baudry as a safe, knowledgeable, and fun place to work through your physical therapy.”

Living with pain is not really living

If you are someone you love is experiencing pain, consult a physical therapist today. You only get one life, so make sure you’re living yours to the fullest!  Invest in your #1 asset – your health.  Call Baudry Therapy today if we help you get back to LIFE!

What is Dry Needling?

Dry needling  uses a filament needle to achieve a twitch response that releases muscle tension and pain. The needle used in this therapeutic process is so thin that most therapy patients do not even feel it penetrate the skin. The twitch response feels like a muscle cramp that results in deactivating the trigger point, reducing pain and normal length function to the affected muscle.

Baudry therapists use trigger point dry needling techniques to provide relief from muscle tightness, joint mobility, and symptoms of pain and dysfunction.