BRIO 2020 Vision: Setting SMART Goals for a Healthier YOU

As this decade comes to an end and a bright, new one begins, it is the perfect time to reflect on 2019 accomplishments and explore new goals for 2020.  But this year, we challenge you to add an element of 2020 Vision to your goal setting. What exactly does that mean?  We think it means finding specific inspiration for your goals – we call it BRIO!  It’s the vim, vigor, vitality that inspires you to live a full life of BRIO!  And we want to help create a clear path for a healthier YOU!

Our team of movement experts will help you take stock of the experiences that were most energizing and inspiring for you during 2019. Those moments reflect your values and strengths and will become the building blocks from which you can create your 2020 vision.  Here are a few steps to help you begin:

Set Clear SMART Goals

While we all have great intentions, the only way to truly achieve your dreams is to set clear goals. Most of our accomplishments in life start as ideas, which get refined into goals. Then, commitment and a strategically planned out action plan are what ultimately bring about success. Your roadmap to more BRIO in 2020 starts here.

Get a note pad and answer the following question:

  1. What do you really want to achieve in 2020?  Dig deep, dream big, and write down some ideas. Be creative, and without limit. What inspires you?
  2. Do you want to run faster, run a marathon? Or is it to get rid of back pain, lose weight, or look better in the mirror? Or maybe to graduate from college? Use the answer to this question to start setting goals.
  3. Take the most important wants and write a SMART goal: That is a goal that is Specific,  Measurable,  Attainable,  Relevant/results-oriented, and Timely.

Here is a sample goal: I will run one 10K race each quarter this year, and one-half marathon this year, to become an advanced runner, lose 15 pounds, and to be able to ski this Mardi Gras season.

Now check to see if it is a SMART goal:

Is this goal Specific? 

Have I answered the “W” questions?

  • Who is involved?  Me, my running shoes, and the road.
  • What do I want to accomplish?  To run four 10k and 1 half marathon, lose 15 pounds, and be ready to ski during Mardi Gras.
  • Where will this happen? At the four 10k’s and one-half marathon selected.
  • When will this happen? One race each quarter ending in December.
  • Which requirements and restraints will be part of the process? I will sign up for races in each quarter.
  • Why am I setting this goal? To become an accomplished runner, lose 15 pounds, and be in shape for skiing during Carnival.

Example of a Non-SMART Goal: I want to run more races to lose weight. This is not specific.

 Is this goal Measurable? 

  • How many? Four 10k races and one-half marathon.
  • How will I know when it is accomplished? When I finish my last race.
  • What is at the finish line? December 31, 2020 (complete my goals, lost weight and able to ski)

Is this goal Action Oriented/ Attainable:

Ask yourself is this goal realistic? Yes, I have been an off and on runner for the past four years. I run about 6 miles per week currently. With a proper training schedule, I should be able to achieve these goals within the year.  I am at least 85% confident I can accomplish this goal.

Is this goal Realistic/ Results-oriented:

Yes, this goal is to become an accomplished runner, lose 15 pounds and to be able to ski during Mardi Gras. This goal results-oriented and is important to me.

Does this goal have Time constraints?

Yes, it must be achieved by the end of the year.

Through this exercise, we’ve determined that we have a SMART Goal.

Do you need help developing your SMART goals?  Let our team of physical therapists help you elevate your BRIO in 2020. Call today to book your  PT evaluation.

 

 

How To Conquer the School Backpack Problem

Summer is coming to a close and our kids will be heading back to school soon.  Here are a few tips to conquer what has become a big concern: the heavy school backpack.

First of all, let’s hope the kids are putting those books to good use and not just carrying them around unopened, collecting dust bunnies! If they do have to carry the books around, let’s look at it from the positive side. Carrying a backpack can be a great exercise. Across our society we see and hear about our youth getting less and less exercise…less P.E. and outdoor play and more time spent on the computer, playing video games, and watching TV. The SAID principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands) states that the body responds to the demands that are put on it. Provide resistance and the body will develop the muscles and strategies to move it. In this instance, the resistance is the backpack. While they may be big and heavy, backpacks can provide a bit of exercise for our children after hours of sitting in class. However, it is important for the kids to have the muscles to support the weight.

To help your child develop the strength and muscles to handle the heavy-load, incorporate the following exercises into their daily schedule:

Bridges: lie on your back with your knees bent and arms to the side, lift your bottom up off the ground as high as you can. Hold this position for 30 seconds. For increased difficulty put your arms in the air as shown in the photo. Still too easy? Try extending one leg and supporting your weight on one leg for 30 seconds.

 

Prone plank: Support your weight on your toes and elbows suspending your body off the ground. Keep your spine straight. Hold for 30-60 seconds.

 

 

Lunges: Hold a stick or dowel rod behind your neck, keep back straight, step forward and go down into a lunge position, return upright. Repeat 10 times on each leg.

 

Here are some additional tips for handling that heavy backpack:

  1. Only carry the books you need.
  2. Perform some squats, backbends or other stretches before carrying your bag.
  3. Use both shoulder straps and the waist strap if the pack has one.
  4. Tighten the straps so the pack sits tightly against the back.
  5. If the backpack seems too big or heavy, take two books out and carry them under your arm. This will help counterbalance the weight.
  6. If you are walking long distances take breaks and put the pack down.
  7. Don’t run with your backpack on.

For more specific answers about your child’s backpack or other concerns, invite your questions and comments.