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Christina Combel, PTA

Christina Combel, PTA earned her Associate of Applied Science in Physical Therapy from Delgado Community College in 2017. In her role as a Physical Therapist Assistant, Combel works directly with the Physical Therapists to help clients and athletes improve mobility and motion, whether to enhance daily function or advance sports performance. She also serves as a Client Liaison, serving as a resource to all clients during treatment and after discharge.

Combel spends her free time playing co-ed recreational softball at Lasalle Park and City Park. She is a Grand Isle native and currently resides in Metairie.

  • 2017 A.A.S Physical Therapy, Delgado Community College

Corporate Wellness Programs Don’t Work: Here’s Why.

Corporate Wellness Programs Don’t Work. Here’s why.

Only 15% of Americans are self-motivated to go to the gym / exercise daily. That means up to 85% of adults don’t get the recommended amounts of exercise each week, often setting themselves up for unnecessary health problems.

For years, companies have tried to inspire their employees to live a healthier lifestyle by developing corporate wellness programs, many with little success. Research has shown that those most likely to take advantage of their employer’s wellness offerings are healthy people who don’t spend a lot on health care, and employees with the highest health-care costs are the least likely to participate. Some companies will even try to incentivize employees but still only 10% utilize this benefit. Bottom line… corporate wellness programs just don’t work.

Rich Baudry, CEO of Baudry Therapy Center | BRIO said, “Before we launched BRIOworks, we spoke to many CEOs and business owners about their perspective on corporate wellness programs.  We found that companies need programs that promote exercise and provide trusted medical resources to employees when they need it, in order to help them stay healthy and productive.”

That’s why we don’t offer a traditional corporate wellness program. Our health performance program provides timely advice, coordinates necessary care, and builds healthy habits through evaluation, education and engagement. And it all happens on the jobsite. We call it BRIOworks – and it does just that.  It works.”

BRIOworks is led by licensed physical therapists who provide corporations with a trusted medical resource. (A movement specialist to “catch employees when they fall.”)  Located onsite, our team is available to see employees at the first instance of pain. With timely assessment, physical therapists provide tips and guidance to address concerns early on, before they become bigger, more costly issues.  They don’t have to wait until the issue grows into a bigger problem.

“By providing simple tips and direction to dealing with common sources of soreness/pain, we give employees confidence and the education to get themselves better, quickly,” said Rich.  “Our clients have found big value in BRIOworks by helping employees to resolve their health issues, while remaining focused on their job.

The true value of corporate wellness programming is in the timely assessment, and care for the inevitable health concerns, that cost both employees and their company’s pain, productivity, and money.

Learn More About BRIOworks

Take control of your healthcare, reduce escalating costs and lead your company to optimal health. We partner with companies to improve musculoskeletal and physical health by building a culture of health performance. From hire to retire, our programs alleviate many of the hidden healthcare costs companies typically bear.

BRIO physical therapists are specialists with a wealth of knowledge in physical health. With simple education and self- directed activities, we help partners prepare, perform,
and recover from daily activity, much like a professional sports team. MORE

 

Opioid Epidemic: It’s Not A Myth

Earlier this month, Rich Baudry had the privilege of speaking to a group of local medical professionals about the ongoing opioid epidemic in the United States. The panel discussion, which was held at University Medical Center, featured lively group discussion from doctors, nurses, nursing students, and educators about opioid use, addiction and alternative forms of treatment for pain.

“It was inspiring to speak with the bright medical professionals of our future and raise awareness of alternate forms of pain treatment such as physical therapy,” said Baudry. “I think it is important to know that even though pain is personal, treating pain takes teamwork.”

Physical therapists treat pain through movement, hands-on care, and patient education.

“We play a valuable role in setting realistic expectations for recovery with or without opioids. We don’t just treat pain symptoms, we find out what is causing the pain and help alleviate it at the source. PT helps patients deal with pain both physically and mentally; whereas opioids just mask the pain.” said Baudry.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sales of prescription opioids have quadrupled in the United States, even though “there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.”

The CDC recently recommended nonopioid approaches like PT when*:

  • The risks of opioid use outweigh the rewards. Potential side effects of opioids include depression, overdose, and addiction, plus withdrawal symptoms when stopping opioid use. Because of these risks, opioids should not be first treatment for chronic pain.
  • Patients want to do more than mask the pain. 79% of patients would prefer non-pharmalogical treatment options. Opioids can mask the pain, but it does not treat the problem. PTs treat pain through movement while partnering with patients to improve or maintain their mobility and quality of life.
  • Pain is located in low backhip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. Evidence shows that exercise as part of a physical therapy treatment plan is most favorable for these conditions.
  • Opioids are prescribed for pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients should receive “the lowest effective dosage,” and opioids “should be combined” with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.
  • Pain lasts 90 days. After 90 days, pain is considered “chronic,” and the risks for continued opioid use increase. An estimated 116 million Americans have chronic pain each year. The CDC guidelines note that nonopioid therapies are “preferred” for chronic pain and that “clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient.”

If you or someone you love is suffering with chronic pain, call Baudry Therapy Center and we can help you start living life again.

*Source: MoveForward PT